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Artists Needed to Encourage Recycling

Image: DSNY

If you are a NYC artist this may be a great opportunity for you.

NYC’s Department of Sanitation is seeking to transform 5 of their garbage trucks. The zero-waste project is Trucks of Art and each truck would be painted by a different artist. The requirements are an idea that either represents the city’s strongest or one that encourages New Yorkers to recycle. So you know where this is going.

So it is in our opinion that these trucks should send a green message. Waste management in NYC is huge. When the city had a landfill of its own, everything was seemingly all good. But this is no longer the case. We do not have a landfill anymore. The last was Fresh Kills landfill. It saw its last dump of trash in 2001 and it is now a city park. As a result, since its closing, NYC sends its trash to landfills out of state. This is not fair.

Therefore, this is Stay Blooming reaching out to fellow environmentalists and artists. As a city known for its creativity, it makes sense to use art as communication. Residents need to be encouraged to actively participate in the recycling process. It needs to interest them. It needs to be personal. This way they are mindful of how they accumulate trash. As a result, this artistic opportunity is very important to prevent trash.

The best part is artists will use recycled paint.

There are only a few days left for submissions. The deadline is on March 31st. To get more information from Department of Sanitation, please click here. Act quickly if interested!

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NYC Compost Project

I had the wonderful pleasure of sitting in for a presentation by a member of Queens Botanical Garden‘s Compost Project. I learned that this project is funded by the NYC’s Department of Sanitation, which is a wonderful effort on their part to create awareness & make rounds for organic matter collection.

organic compost
A complimentary bag of organic compost from Queen’s Botanical Garden’s Compost Project.

Here’s what I learned. Organic compost is made from food scraps, coffee grounds, soiled paper, and also leaf & yard waste. The process generally takes about 6 months, requiring a sheltered & enclosed space away from rodents (inevitable New York natives) and the elements but allowing for air to pass through. You can check to see if your compost is ready by taking a handful and putting it in air-tight bag. Smell the contents the next day and if it smells like ammonia, your compost is not ready. A good compost is thoroughly decomposed.

The reason for these efforts? Collecting organic compost recycles it completely and creates a mutualistic relationship between our trash & our sustainability needs as of lately. It also prevents it from entering landfills as trash. When organic matter finds itself there, it can produce methane as it decomposes which is more toxic to our atmosphere than CO2; adding to our greenhouse gas issue. You know, climate change.

nyc recyclables
Click to enlarge.

Homeowners and landlords can enroll their properties in organics collection with the Department of Sanitation by clicking here for the application.

Tenants of buildings can apply too but are encouraged to get applications from other residents living on the premises. If that’s not possible, there are also food scrap drop-off sites and you can click here for locations to those.

my organic compost use
Fun fact: Organic compost can also be used for house plants.

I hope this encourage readers to think about their trash a bit more consciously. If you’re considering composting but just want to learn more, consider reaching out to the NYC Project Compost sites by clicking here. There are a few different ways to get involved no matter who you are… try it out!

Happy composting!