Buddhism

Meditation through Free Writing

AJ meditating

Meditation is one of the best ways to relax your mind.  The practice is done by sitting quietly still for a prolonged amount of time.  Allowing yourself to not think of anything other than perhaps your breathing—which is the best way to meditate.  It’s very well-known for its ability to reduce stress/anxiety, increase self-awareness, improve focus, as well as many other benefits

As therapeutic as that is, there is another way to achieve something close to that bliss consciously. We’d like to call it, meditation through free writing.

In a previous post, called Therapeutic Writing, we mentioned how writing can be a calming agent.  More specifically, free writing easily allows your mind to wander more than any other form.  “You can get to a point that you (kind of) lose consciousness in the art of your writing.”  And that’s how it becomes meditation.  It could also be useful if you’re having a difficult time sitting still to meditate—may even motivate you to meditate afterwards.

writing

How do you free write to meditate?
Here is a great way to begin along with some tips:

  1. Set aside about 15-30 minutes to write.  The activity could take up some time—using a timer is highly suggested!
  2. Find a quiet place where you’ll have no distractions.  Phones go on silent.
  3. Make sure you have a good amount of writing space in your notebook or journal.  Prepare to write a lot and not break a good flow.
  4. Start by writing whatever is the first thing to come to your mind even if it’s silly, dry, or what you’d rather not be writing about.  You’re allowed to not have a topic.
  5. Remain judgment free.  This is an activity meant to stimulate your deeper thoughts and bring them to the surface.  So, don’t hesitate to be honest with your expression.
  6. Don’t stop writing until you reached your desired time limit.

Let us know your experience meditation through free writing by leaving a comment below!  Or, feel free to email your feedback to alyssablooms@gmail.com.

References
Thorpe, Matthew. “12 Science-Based Benefits of Meditation.” Healthline, July 2017. July 2018. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/12-benefits-of-meditation.

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